DESERTION AND ESPIONAGE

Immediately after the Fifth plenium a large number of chauvinistic Greek elements began to desert the fighting ranks of DAG. At first, there were single deserters, here and there, but later groups deserted. The greatest wave of desertions was after the destruction of the democratic forces on Gramos and after the mobilization of the population.

At the same time as the Greek desertions, Macedonians also began to desert. The Macedonians deserted because of the injustices caused by the Greek chauvinists in the ranks of DAG. Regardless of their courage or sacrifice, the Macedonian fighters would receive compliments but never promotions or medals. The situation with the Greek fighters was different. Even if they did not deserve it, they were complimented, given awards and also promoted.

After the desertion of the partisans, to save their lives, they had to betray those who until recently had been their colleagues and all the military and strategic details that they had available to them. As well as the ordinary partisans, higher ranking cadres from DAG started to desert such as 'Saldaros' from Pirea named Fani Arvantis who was the chief intelligence officer in the DAG headquarters.

In April 1949 without anyone seeing or hearing, Fani left for the village Cherkez Kjoj near the Sorovichko region where he had already agreed to meet the monarcho-fascist forces. They had to come to the village and taken him into custody. The encounter was held in front of the whole village and was seen by all; and all of that acting was seen by a Macedonian band which had been hiding near the village.

The deserter Fani Arvanitis, after the betrayal and handing over of information to the senior Greek military officers about the secret plans of DAG's headquarters that only he knew, was freed, rewarded and returned to his birthplace Pirea as a free citizen. He immediately started to publish propaganda and brochures with military content against KPG and the armed forces of DAG.

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Lerin in Mourning
 















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